What is kriek style beer?
One of my first encounters with kriek-style beer was at The Sovereign Bar, located in Washington. I had the opportunity to choose a variety from an extensive vintage collection in…

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How ancient torture inspires brewers to experiment creatively
Learning about the ancient method of torture called Scaphism, Billy Powell, the owner of the Long Island Nightmare Brewing Company, felt that he simply had to brew beer inspired by…

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Jiri Karlik: “Friends Restaurant can call its craft beer”
The brewery in the Minsk Friends restaurant has been operating since 2014. The equipment of the Czech manufacturer Pacovske Strojirny is installed here. A specially invited brewer from the Czech…

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Seafood & Beer Food Paring

When dishes with gills, fins, tentacles and shells are presented on the menu, most of us will prefer wine. Undoubtedly, white or less full-bodied red wine goes well with various seafood delicacies. With beer, it’s a bit more complicated, but the result will exceed all expectations. The style of beer you have never attached importance to can be a revelation in itself when served with a suitable seafood dish. Seafood cooks in an article in Food & Wine magazine offer some of their favorite mixes. Pivo.by publishes a translation of the material.

“It may surprise you at first glance. After all, the delicate taste of oysters may seem like a bad pair for a dark and rich stout. But try this combination and you will see how the fried, malt notes of the stout work wonders with salted oysters, ”says Jenn Grosskruger, chef at Ocean Prime in Philadelphia. He suggests trying out the Great Lakes Brewing Shuck IT Oyster Stout, and we recommend Pearl Jet from Marston’s Brewery. The salty aftertaste of beer is perfect for oysters.

“Pilsner’s slightly golden texture adds sourness that literally cuts through the richness of fried dough,” says Lou Rossi, chef at Castle Hill Inn in Newport, Rhode Island. He offers to try The Crisp Sixpoint Brewery brewery, which is brewed in a traditional European style. We can advise any Czech Pilsner from our catalog.

A higher alcohol IPA may be too bitter for seafood, while a lightweight IPA session will add the right amount of hop component that won’t kill the grilled octopus. Grosskruger offers to try the Session IPA brewery Samuel Adams. “The bright citrus-hop aroma of this beer is replaced by aromatic notes of grapefruit and pine with light herbal and lemon notes,” says the chef.

Bitter notes help balance the sweet. And that is why the taste of the American IPA, in which the main role is played by hops, is ideal for the natural sweetness of scallops. For testing, Fathom IPA from Ballast Point Brewery from San Diego, known for its Sculpin variety, or any other rich IPA, is suitable.

When it comes to food paring, Belgian farm ales are almost always a good choice. Their soft astringency and delicate spicy aroma complement a wide range of products. But sea bass can be the best “pair” for the season. We suggest you try Saison Dupont, which, according to beer connoisseurs, is considered an exemplary season. This balanced beer is a great combination for sea bass (and most other fish).

Sour styles of beer are some of the most difficult in brewing craft. At first glance, obviously tart, citrus, sour notes in such a beer can scare you away. But you still change your mind when you try it in combination with fresh fried or sauteed trout. The chef offers to try the SeaQuench Ale brewery Dogfish Head. “This sour ale is made with the addition of black lime and sea salt, and this is the perfect combination with the delicate taste of the trout and its layered texture,” Grosskruger explains.

Let us return to the season, a style whose complex character and moderate bitterness go well with a wide variety of dishes, in particular with fatty salmon meat. We suggest you try the Hennepin Ommegang Brewery. Grosskruger describes this variety as “dry and effervescent,” with notes of pepper and citrus, which is the perfect match for salmon.

Lobster meat has a rich and rich buttery taste, which only intensifies when it is stewed in melted butter. To kill all this taste, you need a beer that is both bitter, vibrant and strong. “The Belgian triple will do the trick,” says chef Rossi of Castle Hill and suggests trying out the St. Triple. Bernardus.

“The swordfish is quite“ fleshy ”in texture, but tastes soft and delicate,” says Grosskruger. The variety that will complement the massiveness of the fish and emphasize its taste is suitable for it. The herbal, tart and salty characteristics of the German goose cope with this task. It is worth a try Kirsch Gose from Victory Brewing.

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